Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

No Echoes by R J Dent

August 4, 2016

Villa Anamaria is an ornate Art Nouveau-style villa in Pefkos, on the Greek island of Rhodes. It is at the end of a beach road overlooking Askeftos Bay. The villa used to belong to Pink Floyd guitarist, David Gilmour, who sold it to an Italian couple several years ago.

 

Villa Anamarie 1990

Villa Anamaria 1990

 

On Pefkos maps, Villa Anamaria is still referred to as the ‘Pink Floyd Villa’.

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It has been on the market for nearly five years, and is currently valued at 1.1 million Euros. So far, no one has offered to buy it, and Villa Anamaria is gradually beginning to look like an unloved, derelict building.

 

No Echoes

 

Once, Villa Anamaria, an ornate house

above a rocky, remote Rhodian bay,

was neat, discrete, resplendent in hot sun,

with turquoise wrought-iron gates and walled garden,

olive tree-lined stone drive and marbled paths

that led to subtly-arranged glades of shade,

past Grecian urns, manicured lawns, statues.

 

Now, just a millionaire’s discarded toy,

empty, abandoned, unwanted, disowned,

no echoes of the distant past resound

or sound in rooms now empty but for dust.

Silence, shutters askew, sun-faded walls,

cracked paving, overgrown groves, creeping weeds,

an empty swimming pool, lawns gone to seed.

 

 

Villa Anamarie 2016

Villa Anamaria 2016

 

No Echoes

by R J Dent

 

Copyright © R J Dent (2016)

 

Follow R J Dent’s work on:

 

Website: http://www.rjdent.com/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4

Blog: https://rjdent.wordpress.com/

twitter: https://twitter.com/RJDent

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rjdentwriter

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/rjdent69

 

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Steve Harley and Cockney Rebel

December 6, 2015

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Steve Harley is an English singer and songwriter, best known for his work with the band he founded in 1970s, the glam rock group Cockney Rebel, with whom he still occasionally tours.

 

The Human Menagerie is Cockney Rebel’s debut studio album. It was produced by Neil Harrison, and released by EMI Records in November 1973.

 

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Tracks:

 

Hideaway

What Ruthy Said

Loretta’s Tale

Crazy Raver

Sebastian

Mirror Freak

My Only Vice

Muriel the Actor

Chameleon

Death Trip

 

All songs written and composed by Steve Harley

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – vocals

Jean-Paul Crocker – electric violin, mandolin, guitar

Milton Reame-James – keyboards

Paul Jeffreys – bass

Stuart Elliott – drums, percussion

 

 

 

The Psychomodo is the second studio album by Cockney Rebel. Produced by Steve Harley and Alan Parsons, it was released by EMI Records in June 1974.

 

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 Tracks:

 

Sweet Dreams

Psychomodo

Mr. Soft

Singular Band

Ritz

Cavaliers

Bed in the Corner

Sling It!

Tumbling Down

 

All songs written and composed by Steve Harley

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – vocals

Jean-Paul Crocker – electric violin, mandolin, guitar

Milton Reame-James – keyboards

Paul Jeffreys – bass

Stuart Elliott – drums, percussion

 

 

The Best Years of Our Lives is the third album by Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel released in March 1975. It was the first album that used Harley’s name ahead of the band (the band was previously known simply as Cockney Rebel). The album contains the band’s biggest hit, the million selling ‘Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me)’

 

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Tracks:

 

Introducing The Best Years

The Mad, Mad Moonlight

Mr. Raffles (Man, It Was Mean)

It Wasn’t Me

Panorama

Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me)

Back to the Farm

49th Parallel

The Best Years of Our Lives

 

All songs written and composed by Steve Harley

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – vocals

Jim Cregan – guitars, backing vocals

George Ford – bass guitar, backing vocals

Duncan Mackay – synthesizer, keyboards, Hammond organ, electric piano, clavinet, elka, grand piano, violin

Stuart Elliott – drums, percussion, marimba

 

 

Timeless Flight is the fourth studio album by Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel, released in 1976.

 

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 Tracks:

 

Red Is a Mean, Mean Colour – 4:29

White, White Dove – 5:37

Understand – 7:15

All Men Are Hungry – 4:51

Black or White (And Step on It) – 5:48

Everything Changes – 2:23

Nothing Is Sacred – 5:43

Don’t Go, Don’t Cry – 5:04

 

All songs written and composed by Steve Harley

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – lead vocals, producer, liner notes

Jim Cregan – guitars, backing vocals

George Ford – bass guitar, backing vocals

Duncan Mackay – keyboards

Stuart Elliott – drums, percussion

 

 

Love’s a Prima Donna is an album by Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel, released in October 1976. The album reached No. 28 in the UK Albums Chart in November 1976.

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 Tracks:

 

Seeking a Love

G.I. Valentine

Finally a Card Came

Too Much Tenderness

(Love) Compared with You

(I Believe) Love’s a Prima Donna

Sidetrack II

Seeking a Love, Pt. 2

If This Is Love (Give Me More)

Carry Me Again

Here Comes the Sun

Innocence and Guilt

Is It True What They Say

 

All songs written and composed by Steve Harley

except Here Comes the Sun by George Harrison

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – vocals, guitar, producer

Jim Cregan – guitar, backing vocals

Jo Partridge – guitar

George Ford – bass, backing vocals

Duncan Mackay – keyboards

Stuart Elliott – drums

 

 

Face to Face: A Live Recording is a live album by Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel, released in 1977. Following the release of the 1976 studio album Love’s a Prima Donna, the band embarked on a UK tour to promote it. Harley recorded a number of concerts between December 1976 and January 1977 and the best tracks were then sorted for a live album.

 

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 Tracks:

 

Here Comes the Sun

(I Believe) Love’s a Prima Donna

The Mad, Mad Moonlight

Red is a Mean, Mean Colour

Sweet Dreams

Finally a Card Came

Psychomodo

If This Is Love (Give Me More)

The Best Years of Our Lives

(Love) Compared with You

Mr. Soft

Sebastian

Seeking a Love

Tumbling Down

Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me)

 

All songs written and composed by Steve Harley

except Here Comes the Sun by George Harrison

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – vocals

Jo Partridge – guitar

George Ford – bass guitar

Duncan Mackay – keyboards

Stuart Elliott – drums

 

 

Hobo with a Grin is a debut solo album by Steve Harley. It was released in July 1979, eighteen months after Harley had disbanded Cockney Rebel.

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 Tracks:

 

Roll the Dice

Amerika the Brave

Living in a Rhapsody

I Wish It Would Rain

Riding the Waves (For Virginia Woolf)

Someone’s Coming

Hot Youth

(I Don’t Believe) God is an Anarchist

Faith, Hope and Charity

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – vocals

Jo Partridge – guitar

George Ford – bass guitar

Duncan Mackay – keyboards

Stuart Elliott – drums

 

 

The Candidate is the second solo studio album by British singer-songwriter Steve Harley released in 1979.

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Tracks:

 

Audience With the Man

Woodchopper

Freedom’s Prisoner

Love on the Rocks

Who’s Afraid?

One More Time

How Good It Feels

From Here to Eternity

Young Hearts (The Candidate)

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – Vocals, Producer (all tracks), Writer (all tracks)

Yvonne Keeley – Backing Vocals

Jo Partridge, Phil Palmer – Guitar

Nico Ramsden – Guitar, Backing Vocals

John Giblin – Bass

Joey Carbone – Keyboards, Backing Vocals

Steve Gregory – Saxophone, Saxophone Arrangement

Stuart Elliott – Drums

Bryn Hawarth – Mandolin (track 1 only)

The English Chorale – Choir (track 3 only)

Robert Howes – Choir Director – Robert Howes (track 3 only)

Jimmy Horowitz – Producer (all tracks), Writer (track 3 only), Celesta (track 2 only)

 

Yes You Can is the third studio album by British singer-songwriter Steve Harley, released in 1992 within Europe and 1993 in the UK.

 

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Tracks:

 

Irresistible

Victim of Love

Rain in Venice

Star for a Week (Dino)

Promises

Fire in the Night

The Alibi

New-Fashioned Way

The Lighthouse

Dancing on the Telephone

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – vocals, 12-string acoustic guitar, harmonica, producer

Jim Cregan – acoustic guitar

Alan Darby – guitar

Rick Driscoll – guitar

Harvey Hinsley – guitar

Robin LeMesurier – guitar

Nick Pynn – acoustic guitar, guitar

Barry Wickens – acoustic guitar, violin, viola

Kevin Powell – bass

Adrian Lee – keyboards

Duncan Mackay – keyboards

Stuart Elliott – drums

Paul Francis – drums

Dave Mattacks – drums

 

 

Poetic Justice is the fourth studio album by British singer-songwriter Steve Harley, released in 1996.

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Tracks:

 

That’s My Life in Your Hands

What Becomes of the Broken-Hearted?

Two Damn’d Lies

Loveless

Strange Communications

All in a Life’s Work

Love Minus Zero-No Limit

Safe

The Last Time I Saw You

Crazy Love

Riding the Waves (For Virginia Woolf)

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – lead vocals, producer

Paul Francis – drums

Andrew Brown – bass, double-bass

Thomas Arnold – Hammond organ, accordion, percussion, piano, keyboards

Ian Nice – piano, keyboards

Nick Pynn – acoustic guitar, 12-string guitar, dulcimer, mando-cello

Phil Beer – electric guitar, acoustic guitar, bottle-neck guitar, violin, vocals

Richard Durrant – classical guitar on ‘Crazy Love’

Mark Price – drums on ‘Strange Communications’ and ‘The Last Time I Saw You’

Herbie Flowers – double-bass on ‘Strange Communications’

Susan Harvey – vocals

 

 

Unplugged is a 1999 live acoustic album by English songwriter and musician Steve Harley.

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 Tracks:

 

My Only Vice (Is the Fantastic Prices I Charge for Being Eaten Alive)”

Star for a Week (Dino)

The Best Years of Our Lives

Judy Teen

The Last Time I Saw You

Mr. Soft

(Love) Compared with You

Tumbling Down

Only You

Bed in the Corner

Sling It!

Riding the Waves (For Virginia Woolf)

Sebastian

Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me)

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – Lead Vocals, Acoustic Guitar, Harmonica, Compiler

Nick Pynn – Acoustic Lead Guitar, Dulcimer, Mando-cello, Violin

 

 

The Quality of Mercy is a studio album from English rock band Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel. Led by Steve Harley, the band’s line-up consisted of new musicians compared to the last Cockney Rebel album. The album was released on CD in the UK and Norway only, through Gott Discs, whilst Pinnacle Records handled the album’s distribution within the UK.

 

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 Tracks:

 

The Last Goodbye

Journey’s End (A Father’s Promise)

Saturday Night at the Fair

No Rain on This Parade

The Coast of Amalfi

The Last Feast

Save Me (From Myself)

When the Halo Slips

A Friend for Life

 

Personnel:

 

Vocals, Guitar – Steve Harley

Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Backing Vocals – Robbie Gladwell

Acoustic Guitar, Violin, Backing Vocals – Barry Wickens

Keyboards – James Lascelles

Bass – Lincoln Anderson

Drums – Adam Houghton

 

 

Stranger Comes to Town is a studio album from English songwriter and musician Steve Harley. The album was released in 2010 and was Harley’s first studio album in five years, after the Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel album The Quality of Mercy.

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Tracks:

 

Faith & Virtue

Take the Men & the Horses Away

For Sale. Baby Shoes. Never Worn.

Stranger Comes to Town

This Old Man

True Love Will Find You in the End

No Bleeding Hearts

Blinded with Tears

Before They Crash the Universe

2,000 Years from Now

 

Personnel:

 

Steve Harley – Acoustic Guitar, Vocals

Stuart Elliott – Percussion, Drums, Hand Drums

Robbie Gladwell – 12 String Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar, Background Vocals

Barry Wickens – Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar, Violin, Viola, Background Vocals

Lincoln Anderson – Bass, Double Bass

James Lascelles – Piano, Synthesizer, Percussion, Keyboards, Hammond B3, Synthesizer Strings, Mini Moog, Dulcimer (Hammer), Melodica, Drums

Kerr Nice – Piano

Katie Brine – Background Vocals

Marcus Greenwood, Sam Hewitson, Maisie Colquhoun, Grace Nickalls, Maya Hodgson, Joe Dobson – Choir, Chorus on “2,000 Years from Now” (from Spooner Row Primary School)

 

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Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel’s work can be found at:

http://www.steveharley.com/

and at:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dpopular&field-keywords=steve+harley&rh=n%3A229816%2Ck%3Asteve+Harley

R J Dent’s work can be found at:

Website: http://www.rjdent.com/

Blog: https://rjdent.wordpress.com/

twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/RJDent

facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/R-J-Dent/344369095423?v=wall

Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/rjdent69?feature=mhum#p/a/u/0/CmnYHWJqQK4

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_nty_author_2gf4mb19VD5NN

Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R._J._Dent

Academia.edu: http://sussex.academia.edu/RussellDent/About

 

Voodoo Excess (Rolling with the Stones) by Jeremy Reed

April 21, 2015

 

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Voodoo Excess

(Rolling with the Stones)

by Jeremy Reed

with an introduction by R J Dent

 

Voodoo Excess, Jeremy Reed’s latest collection, is a history of the Rolling Stones in verse, prose and prose-poetry.

In Voodoo Excess, Jeremy Reed chronicles the Stones’ progress from the early days at the Crawdaddy Club in 1962 to the fiftieth anniversary in 2012; he explicates Mick Jagger’s dance steps and his accent; he examines the Rolling Stones’ logo; and the different ways Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood angle their cigarettes; he describes the emotional impact of the Stones’ Hyde Park performance; he details the Redlands bust and the anti-establishment stance and attitude of the band; and he looks unflinchingly at the violence of Altamont and the inevitable death of the summer of love.

Voodoo Excess is far more than a Rolling Stones biography and it is far more than a collection of Rolling Stones-themed poems and prose-poems – what Jeremy Reed has achieved with Voodoo Excess is to provide an incredibly in-depth, up-close and intimate chronicle of the life and times of a group of musicians who have – for fifty years – collectively and individually continued to define the term ‘rock and roll rebels’.

 

Product details:

Title: Voodoo Excess

Author: Jeremy Reed

Format: Paperback

Pages: 224 pages

Publisher: Enitharmon Press

Published: 12 June 2015

ISBN-10: 1907587500

ISBN-13: 978-1907587504

 

Contents

INTRODUCTION: The Rolling Stones and Jeremy Reed (by R J Dent)

PART 1 – THE GREATEST ROCK AND ROLL BAND IN THE WORLD

PART 2 – THE BRIAN JONES YEARS: 1962–1969

PART 3 – THE MICK TAYLOR YEARS: 1969–74

PART 4 – MEMORABILIA/BONUS MATERIAL

PART 5 – THE RONNIE WOOD YEARS: 1975–

 

Voodoo Excess is available at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Voodoo-Excess-Jeremy-Reed/dp/1907587500

and at:

http://www.amazon.com/Voodoo-Excess-Jeremy-Reed/dp/1907587500

and at:

https://www.waterstones.com/book/voodoo-excess/jeremy-reed/9781907587504

 

Follow Jeremy Reed’s work on http://www.jeremyreed.co.uk/

Follow R J Dent’s work on:

Website: http://www.rjdent.com/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4

Blog: https://rjdent.wordpress.com/

twitter: https://twitter.com/RJDent

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rjdentwriter

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/rjdent69

 LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/r-j-dent-29a8a724?trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile

 

Bonnie Dobson’s Morning Dew

October 23, 2014

 

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Bonnie Dobson (born November 13, 1940, Toronto, Canada) is a Canadian songwriter, singer, and guitarist, most known in the 1960s for composing the song ‘Morning Dew’. The song, augmented (with a co-writing credit) by Tim Rose, became a melancholy folk-rock standard.

 

‘Morning Dew’, also known as ‘(Walk Me Out in the) Morning Dew’, is a post-apocalyptic song, a dialogue between the last man and woman left alive following an apocalyptic catastrophe. Dobson has stated that the initial inspiration for ‘Morning Dew’ was the film On the Beach which focuses on the survivors of virtual global annihilation by nuclear holocaust.

 

Dobson would recall how the guests at her friend’s apartment were speculating about a nuclear war’s aftermath and ‘after everyone went to bed, I sat up and suddenly I just started writing this song… What happened with that song is that I saw a film called On The Beach and it made a tremendous impression on me, that film. Particularly at that time because everybody was very worried about the bomb and whether we were going to get through the next ten years. It was a very immediate problem and I remember I sat up all night talking with some friends who went to bed or something and I just sat and suddenly I just started writing… and this song just came out and really it was a kind of re-enactment of that film in a way where at the end there is nobody left and it was a conversation between these two people trying to explain what’s happening. It was really apocalyptic, that was what it was about… It took the form of a conversation between the last man and woman – post-apocalypse – one trying to comfort the other while knowing there’s absolutely nothing left.’

 

Morning Dew by Bonnie Dobson

 

Take me for a walk in the morning dew, my honey

Take me for a walk me in the morning dew, my love

You can’t go walking in the morning dew today

You can’t go walking in the morning dew today

But listen! I hear a man moaning, ‘Lord’

I know I hear a man moaning, ‘Lord’

You didn’t hear a man moan at all

You didn’t hear a man moan at all

But I know I hear my baby crying, ‘Mama’

Yes, I know I hear my baby crying, ‘Mama’

You’ll never hear your baby cry again

You’ll never hear your baby cry again

Oh, where have all the people gone?

Won’t you tell me, where have all the people gone

Don’t you worry about the people any more

Don’t you worry about the people any more

Take me for a walk in the morning dew, my honey

Take me for a walk in the morning dew, my love

You can’t go walking in the morning dew today

You can’t go walking in the morning dew today

You can’t go walking in the morning dew today

 

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Bonnie Dobson premiered ‘Morning Dew’ in her set at the inaugural Mariposa Folk Festival that year with the song’s first recorded version being on Dobson’s At Folk City live album in 1962.

Dobson would not record a studio version of the song until 1969, that being for her Bonnie Dobson album. ‘Morning Dew’ was not published until 1964 when Jac Holzman of Elektra Records contacted Dobson with an offer to sign her as a songwriter as Elektra artist Fred Neil had heard ‘Morning Dew’ and wished to record it.

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‘In 1964 I was contacted by Jac Holzman of Elektra Records, who told me that Fred Neil wanted to record ‘Morning Dew’ and that as I’d not published it, would I like to do so with his company, Nina Music. I signed a contract and Neil recorded the song. His is the original cover, on Tear Down the Walls by Vince Martin and Fred Neil. His singing of it differed from mine in that he altered the lyric slightly, changing ‘Take me for a walk in the morning dew’ to ‘Walk me out in the morning dew.’ He was also the first person to rock it.’

 

Morning Dew by Bonnie Dobson (arranged by Fred Neil)

 

Walk me out

In the morning dew, my honey

Walk me out

In the morning dew today

 

Can’t walk you out

In the morning dew, my baby

Can’t walk you out

In the morning dew today

 

Thought I heard

A young man moanin’ Lord

Thought I heard

A young man moanin’ Lord

 

You didn’t hear

No young man moanin’ Lord

You didn’t hear

No young man moan today

 

Where have all the people gone

My honey

Where haye all the people gone

Today

 

Don’t you worry

‘Bout those people, baby

You’ll never see those people

Anymore

 

Thought I heard

My baby cryin’ mama

Thought I heard

My baby cryin’ mama

 

You didn’t hear

No baby cryin’ mama

You didn’t hear

No baby cry today

 

Walk me out

In the morning dew, my honey

Walk me out

In the morning dew today

 

Can’t walk you out

In the morning dew, my baby

I’ll never walk you out

In the morning dew again

 

The first studio recording of ‘Morning Dew’ appeared on the 1964 album Tear Down the Walls by Fred Neil and Vince Martin. It was this version which introduced the song to Tim Rose, who in 1966 recorded ‘Morning Dew’ for his self-titled debut album after soliciting permission to revise the song with a resultant co-writing credit. Dobson agreed without having any intended revision specified and as of the February 1967 release of the Tim Rose single version of ‘Morning Dew’ the standard songwriting credit for the song has been Bonnie Dobson and Tim Rose: Dobson, who in 1998 averred she’d never met Rose (who died in 2002), has stated that she’s received 75% songwriting royalty as she retains sole writing credit for the song’s music.

 

 

 

Morning Dew (with additional lyrics by Tim Rose)

Walk me out in the morning dew, my honey

Walk me out in the morning dew today

Can’t walk you in the morning dew, my honey

They can’t walk you out in the morning dew at all

I thought I heard a young girl crying, momma

I thought I heard a young girl cry today

You didn’t hear no young girl crying, momma

You didn’t hear no young girl cry at all

 

Walk me out in the morning dew, my honey

Walk me out in the morning dew today

Can’t walk you out in the morning dew, my baby

They can’t walk you out in the morning dew at all

 

Thought I heard a young man crying, momma

Thought I heard a young man cry today

You didn’t hear no young man crying, momma

You didn’t hear no young man cry at all

 

Now there’s no more morning dew

Now there’s no more morning dew

What they were saying all these years is true

‘Cause there’s no more morning dew

 

Oh, now there’s no more morning dew

Oh, now there’s no more morning dew

Lord, what they were saying all these years was true

Oh, ’cause there’s no more morning dew

 

Yeah, now there’s no more morning dew, now, now, now

Oh, now there’s no more morning dew

What they were saying all these years is so true

They have chased away all our morning dew

 

Oh, now there’s no more morning dew

Oh, now there’s no more morning dew

 

 

Bonnie Dobson recalls her involvement with Tim Rose: ‘In 1967 while I was living in Toronto, I had a call from Manny Greenhill, my agent, saying that Tim Rose wanted to record ‘Morning Dew’, but he wanted to change the lyric. I duly signed a new contract and Rose was written in as co-lyricist on the basis of his new lyric.’

 

Dobson also says: ‘Tim Rose, I’ve never met him, was written into the contract subsequently, I think it was 1967, maybe early ’68. I had a call from Manny Greenhill saying Tim Rose is going to record your song but he wants to make a few changes, write a new lyric. I think what happened was there was no way we could not actually cut him in on the lyric because I had performed it and then published it. I hadn’t done it the way you’re supposed to do things, so it was somewhat in the public domain.’

 

‘So that was difficult, but the worst part was that when I came to England in 1969 and I gave my debut concert at Queen Elizabeth Hall everybody had thought that Tim Rose had written that song because he had never ever given me any credit at any time for anything to do with that song. I’ve written songs with other people and I have never claimed them for my own. I just think it was really a dreadfully dishonest thing to do. I still get my royalty check, but I still consider it quite a grievous injury.’

‘In 1968, when Lulu released her single of ‘Morning Dew’, a full-page ad was placed in Billboard referring to it as ‘Tim Rose’s Great Hit’ – no mention of Ms. Dobson at all.’

‘From that time till now-particularly here in England – people have never believed that I had anything to do with the writing of ‘Morning Dew’. Rose never gave me any credit. Even Nazareth’s single from 1981 has only him listed as the composer.’

‘It has caused me a lot of aggravation and unhappiness. Even though I have and still do receive substantial royalties (75 percent as opposed to his 25 percent), it doesn’t make up for the man’s behaviour.’

 

 ‘Morning Dew’ became a signature song of the Grateful Dead, whose singer/guitarist Jerry Garcia was alerted to the Fred Neil recording by roadie Laird Grant in 1966. The Grateful Dead introduced ‘Morning Dew’ into their repertoire as their opening number in January 1967: that same month the group recorded their self-titled debut album featuring ‘Morning Dew’ and released that March.

 

 

Dobson says: ‘I always liked the Dead’s version of ‘Morning Dew.’ My one regret is that when they first appeared in Toronto – was it 1967 or 1968 at the O’keefe Centre? – they didn’t sing ‘Morning Dew’ in the concert that I attended. I also regret that I was too shy to go backstage and meet them.’

The Grateful Dead’s patronage of ‘Morning Dew’ has resulted in the song’s being recorded by a number of hard rock acts such as Episode Six (featuring Roger Glover and Ian Gillan – later of Deep Purple):

It has also been covered by Blackfoot (who added an extra verse):

Walk me out in the morning dew, baby
Please walk me out in the morning dew
I can’t walk you out in the morning dew
I can’t walk you out in the morning dew, yeah

Yeah

I thought I heard a young girl cry, baby
I thought I heard a young girl cry
You didn’t hear no young girl cry
You didn’t hear no young girl cry today

Well, I thought I saw a flash in the sky this morning
Thought I saw a flash in the sky today
Well, the earth it trembles and
The sky is no longer blue
Now there is no more morning dew, oh today

(Solo)

Now there is no more morning dew
Now there is no more morning dew today
What they’ve been sayin’ all these years has come true
Now there is no more morning dew
Oh, today
No more morning dew today

Won’t you please walk me out in the dew
The dew
Morning dew, yeah, yeah

 

In Robert Plant’s version, Plant changed Tim Rose’s line ‘What they were saying all these years is so true’ to ‘What they been saying all these years is not true’:

The Jeff Beck Group version comes complete with bagpipes at the start to evoke the highlands):

Long John Baldry’s version has a beautiful piano introduction, broken by the rumble of an atomic explosion, followed immediately by screams or sirens or both:

 

and Jazz Is Dead’s instrumental version is full of emotional power, despite being lyric-less:

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Different versions of Morning Dew can be found on:

 

1962 Bonnie Dobson, At Folk City

 1963 The Briarwoods Well Well Well

1964 Vince Martin & Fred Neil, Tear Down the Walls

1966 Tim Rose Tim Rose, ‘Morning Dew’ (single), plus later re-recordings

1967 Episode Six ‘Morning Dew’ single

1971 Nazareth Nazareth

1972 Blue Mink Live at the Talk of the Town

1973 Clannad Clannad

1974 Blue Mink Fruity

1980 Long John Baldry Long John Baldry

1984 Blackfoot Vertical Smiles

1990 Devo Smooth Noodle Maps

 2002 Robert Plant Dreamland

 2003 Mungo Jerry Adults Only

 

 

Bonnie Dobson’s Morning Dew

www.rjdent.com

 

Almost Famous

June 22, 2014

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Almost Famous is a 2000 comedy-drama film written, co-produced, and directed by Cameron Crowe, telling the coming-of-age story of a teenage journalist writing for Rolling Stone magazine while on the road with a fictitious 1970s rock band named Stillwater. The film is semi-autobiographical, Crowe himself having been a teenage writer for Rolling Stone.

The film received positive reviews, and received four Oscar nominations, with Crowe winning one for best original screenplay. It also earned the 2001 Grammy Award Best Compilation Soundtrack Album. Renowned film critic Roger Ebert hailed it the best film of the year.

 

 

The film is based on Cameron Crowe’s experiences touring with rock bands Poco, The Allman Brothers Band, Led Zeppelin, Eagles, and Lynyrd Skynyrd. In a Rolling Stone article, he talks about how he lost his virginity, fell in love, and met his heroes, experiences that are shared by William, the main character in the film.

Crowe compiled an alternate version of the film for home video called Almost Famous: Untitled, which was a compilation of both released footage and his favorite deleted scenes. It runs for about forty minutes longer than the theatrical release and was subtitled “The Bootleg Cut“.

 

 

Cast

 

Patrick Fugit as William Miller

Michael Angarano as Young William

Billy Crudup as Russell Hammond

Frances McDormand as Elaine Miller

Kate Hudson as Penny Lane

Jason Lee as Jeff Bebe

Zooey Deschanel as Anita Miller

Anna Paquin as Polexia Aphrodisia

Fairuza Balk as Sapphire

Bijou Phillips as Estrella Starr

Noah Taylor as Dick Roswell

Philip Seymour Hoffman as Lester Bangs

Terry Chen as Ben Fong-Torres

Jay Baruchel as Vic Munoz

Jimmy Fallon as Dennis Hope

Rainn Wilson as David Felton

Mark Kozelek as Larry Fellows

Liz Stauber as Leslie Hammond

John Fedevich as Ed Vallencourt

Eric Stonestreet as Sheldon the Desk Clerk

 

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Almost Famous – A Film by Cameron Crowe

 

www.rjdent.com

 

 

 

 

The Wicker Man

September 18, 2013

The Wicker Man is a 1973 British horror film directed by Robin Hardy and written by Anthony Shaffer. The film stars Edward Woodward, Christopher Lee, Diane Cilento, Ingrid Pitt, and Britt Ekland. Paul Giovanni composed the soundtrack. The film is now considered a cult classic.

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The Wicker Man original poster

Shaffer read David Pinner’s 1967 novel Ritual, in which a devout Christian policeman is called to investigate what appears to be the ritual murder of a young girl in a rural village. Shaffer decided that it would serve well as the source material for the project.

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Inspired by the basic scenario in Ritual, Shaffer wrote a screenplay which centres on the visit of Police Sergeant Neil Howie to the isolated island of Summerisle, in search of a missing girl the locals claim never existed. Howie, a devout Christian, is appalled to find that the inhabitants of the island practice a form of Celtic paganism.

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Shaffer wanted the film to be ‘a little more literate’ than the average horror picture. The idea of a confrontation between a modern Christian and a remote, pagan community continued to intrigue Shaffer, who performed painstaking research on paganism. Working with director Robin Hardy, the film was conceived as presenting the pagan elements objectively and accurately, accompanied by authentic music and a believable, contemporary setting.

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The image of the wicker man, which gave the filmmakers their title, was taken from a paragraph in The Gallic War, Julius Caesar’s account of his wars in what is now France. Caesar wrote:

‘The whole of the Gallic nation… believe that unless one human life is offered for another the power and presence of the immortal gods cannot be propitiated. They also hold state sacrifices of a similar kind. Some of them use huge images of the gods, and fill their limbs, which are woven from wicker, with living people. When these images are set on fire the people inside are engulfed in flames and killed. They believe that the gods are more pleased by such punishments when it is inflicted upon those who are caught engaged in theft or robbery or other crimes; but if there is a lack of people of this kind, they will even stoop to punishing the guiltless.’ (Julius Caesar, The Gallic War, 6.17).

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The Wicker Man, released in 1973, became a cult classic. Hardy and Schaffer also collaborated on a novelization of their film.

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In 2011, a spiritual sequel entitled The Wicker Tree was released.

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It was directed by Robin Hardy, and featured an appearance by Christopher Lee. Hardy first published the story as a novel, under the name Cowboys for Christ.

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First announced during April 2000, filming on The Wicker Tree began on 19 July 2009. It follows two young American Christian evangelists who travel to Scotland; like Neil Howie in The Wicker Man, the two Americans are virgins who encounter a pagan laird and his followers.

Here is a trailer: 

 

 

Those involved in the production of the film have given conflicting statements regarding the identity of Christopher Lee’s character, referred to only as ‘Old Gentleman’ in the credits Writer/director Robin Hardy has stated that the ambiguity was intentional, but that fans of The Wicker Man will immediately recognise Lee’s character as Lord Summerisle.

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Recently, it was announced that a fully-restored print of The Wicker Man is due to be released on DVD as The Wicker Man (The Final Cut). Robin Hardy has confirmed this.

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Here is a trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXFYU3v-wL4

 

 

The Wicker Man

(c) R J Dent 2013

www.rjdent.com

Pompeii

August 3, 2013

The city of Pompeii was an ancient Roman town-city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei.

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Pompeii along with Herculaneum and many villas in the surrounding area, were mostly destroyed and buried under 4 to 6 metres (13 to 20 ft) of ash and pumice in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD.

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The eruption was cataclysmic for the town. Evidence for the destruction originally came from a surviving letter by Pliny the Younger, who saw the eruption from a distance and described the death of his uncle Pliny the Elder, an admiral of the Roman fleet, who tried to rescue citizens. The site was lost for about 1500 years until its initial rediscovery in 1599.

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The objects that lay beneath the city have been well preserved for thousands of years because of the lack of air and moisture. These artifacts provide an extraordinarily detailed insight into the life of a city during the Pax Romana.

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Pompeii has been a tourist destination for over 250 years. Today it has UNESCO World Heritage Site status and is one of the most popular tourist attractions of Italy, with approximately 2.5 million visitors every year.

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In 1971, the rock band Pink Floyd recorded the live concert film Pink Floyd: Live at Pompeii, performing six songs in the ancient Roman amphitheatre in the city. The audience consisted only of the film’s production crew and some local children.

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Pompeii

(c) R J Dent 2013

http://www.rjdent.com

Credit Where Credit’s Due by R J Dent

May 15, 2012

 R J Dent’s article on plagiarism – based on a real incident.

 

 

Plagiarism may be a dirty word, but there’s always someone ready to steal it…

(Note: The names of the musicians, groups and albums in this article have been changed in order to avoid anyone being libeled.)

It’s every writer’s dream: the brilliant and famous singer of the world’s greatest group gets in touch with you and says: “We’re writing a new album, so can you help us with the lyrics?” You’ve started to make a bit of a name for yourself with your writing, so you graciously accept the offer, and within a year you are fully valued, recognized and rewarded (artistically, philosophically, spiritually, socially and financially) for your ability to write perfect and succinct lyrics on important subjects.

That’s the summary of a dream of many aspiring poets/lyricists.

That’s nothing like the version that happened to me.

First of all, it wasn’t anywhere grand, like backstage at the O2 Arena, Earl’s Court, or even the MAN for that matter. No, this was an introduction by a friend in a café. Read more...

 

R J Dent says: ‘Credit Where Credit’s Due is a cautionary tale, based on a real event.’

Credit Where Credit’s Due was recently published in Writer’s Muse.

 

 

Credit Where Credit’s Due

Copyright © R J Dent (2010 & 2016)

 

Follow R J Dent’s work on:

 

Website: http://www.rjdent.com/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4

Blog: https://rjdent.wordpress.com/

twitter: https://twitter.com/RJDent

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rjdentwriter

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/rjdent69

 

 

The Pink Floyd Story Considered as a NASA Space Flight Report by R J Dent

February 22, 2012

Precisely eight days and three minutes after their lunar launch on May 16, Pink Floyd (hereafter referred to as PF) crewmen Roger Waters, Nick Mason, Rick Wright and Syd Barrett landed PF at the recording studio in the Mohave Desert on the Eastern Seaboard, 399 miles east of American Samoa.

PF ventured closer to the moon than any craft has ever done, and the PF crew received the traditional hero’s welcome from those who waited in the pre-dawn hours aboard the SS Arnold Layne for its re-entry. Read more…

 

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R J Dent says: ‘I always wanted to write a Pink Floyd story, and I was inspired to write The Pink Floyd Story Considered as a NASA Space Flight Report after reading J.G. Ballard’s The Assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy Considered as a Downhill Motor Race and Princess Margaret’s Facelift, both from Ballard’s classic, The Atrocity Exhibition.’

Roxy Music by Roxy Music

August 23, 2011

 

Roxy Music is the debut album by art-rock band Roxy Music, released in June 1972.

Track listing:

 

All songs written by Bryan Ferry.

 

Re-Make/Re-Model – 5:14

Ladytron – 4:26

If There Is Something – 6:34

2HB – 4:30

The Bob (Medley) – 5:48

Chance Meeting – 3:08

Would You Believe? – 3:53

Sea Breezes – 7:03

Bitters End – 2:03

 

 

Personnel

 

Bryan Ferry – vocals, piano, Hohner Pianet, Mellotron

Brian Eno – VCS3 synthesizer, tape effects, backing vocals

Andy Mackay – oboe, saxophone, backing vocals

Phil Manzanera – electric guitar

Graham Simpson – bass guitar

Paul Thompson – drums

 

 

The opening track is Re-Make/Re-Model, which starts with a musique concrète introduction, a short collage of cocktail party noise, before launching into a stereotypical 1950s song structure. Whilst the basic backing track of guitar, acoustic piano, bass guitar, tenor saxophone and drums is relatively straightforward and traditional in form, other elements of the arrangement are quite bizarre and futuristic: Eno plays continual squalls of atonal oscillator noise from his Electronic Music Studios VCS3 synthesizer, whilst Ferry’s lead vocal style is strikingly distraught and anguished in tone, as befits the lyric: I tried but I could not find a way/ Looking back all I did was look away. The lead guitar and saxophone solos in the middle of the song also tend towards cacophony. At the end of the song, each instrument is allowed a short solo break in turn; the guitar mimics Duane Eddie’s C’mon Everybody; the bass guitar solo mimics the riff from the Beatles song Day Tripper. The lyrics describe a man who is afraid to approach a woman he’s attracted to. Ferry explained in an interview that Eno and MacKay’s backing vocal chorus of CPL 593H was the number plate of the car in which the woman is riding. Ferry took inspiration from a personal experience – the number plate CPL 593H belonged to a car he previously owned. After he’d sold it, Ferry saw it parked in a street, and observed an attractive young woman get into the car and drive away. To immortalize the moment, he wrote the song.

 

Ladytron is the album’s second song. It has distinctive instrumentation, including an oboe solo, liberal use of the mellotron’s famous ‘three violins’ tape facility, and much processing of the other instruments by Brian Eno via his Electronic Music Studios VCS3 synthesizer and tape echo. The eerie sounds at the start of the song were created by Brian Eno, after Bryan Ferry asked him to produce something reminiscent of the Lunar Landing. Lyrically, it presents Ferry as a Casanova-style seducer of women, whilst being simultaneously enraptured by them. Another interpretation is that the Ladytron is a female robot (hence the name) that is being seduced by Ferry. According to The Times, Ladytron is one of Roxy Music’s ‘best loved songs.’

 

If There Is Something is the third song on the album. The song begins in a rather light-hearted, jaunty fashion, a slight pastiche of country music, with honky-tonk style piano and twangy guitar. Ferry’s singing is nonchalant and jocular. However the mood of the song builds with a repeated instrumental motif hauntingly played between guitar and saxophone, and then Ferry’s vocals re-enter to provide a fraught vocal climax, the lyrics including a reference to a passion for secrets, roses, and (bizarrely), growing potatoes. The instrumental motifs then return, finally giving way to an emotional end section where Ferry’s impassioned, nostalgia-infused and melancholy vocals are set on top of a lush blend of backing vocals and the mellotron ‘three violins’ tape set. The song is tripartite in structure and it has been suggested that the first part of the song is a youth wondering about love, the second part is an adult in the heat of passion and the third part is the singer in old age thinking about his past love. The song features prominently in the 2008 film, Flashbacks of a Fool, written and directed by Baillie Walsh, and starring Daniel Craig. In a memorable scene, a young Joe Scott and Ruth Davies dance in Ruth’s living room and mime to the song; Joe dressed as Bryan Ferry.

 

2HB is the first of the songs that are thematically linked to films/movies. The title of 2HB is a pun – the song is not in fact about pencil lead, but is actually Ferry’s tribute to Hollywood film star Humphrey Bogart. (2HB = To Humphrey Bogart.) 2HB quotes the line ‘Here’s looking at you, kid’ – a famous line from the Bogart classic, Casablanca (1942). The song is gentle and mellow in tone, evoking a smoky cabaret atmosphere and classic black-and-white films. The song is dominated by Ferry’s Hohner electric piano, and features a sax solo in the middle where MacKay’s playing is treated with tape echo effects by Brian Eno.

 

Chance Meeting was inspired by David Lean’s Brief Encounter (1945), and includes lyrics inspired by the film/movie’s dialogue: I never thought I’d see you again/ Where have you been until now?/ Well how are you?/ How have you been?/ It’s a long time since we last met/ It seems like yesterday/ When I first saw you/ In your red dress smile/ How could I forget that day?/ I know that time spent well is so rare…

 

The Bob (Medley) is the next track. The song was inspired by the war film/movie, The Battle of Britain (1969), the song’s title (BoB) being an acronym for Battle of Britain. The sound of gunfire and explosions from the battlefields can be heard throughout the instrumental refrain.

 

Would You Believe? is an elegant, delicate and anguished lament to an inscrutable, elusive someone. Would you believe in what I do/ When the things that I make are all for you?… Ferry sings forlornly, before adding cynically: Well I’m sure I’ll love you all my life/ And in the morning too….

 

Sea Breezes is the penultimate song on the album and is a clear precursor to Song for Europe: We’ve been running round in our present state/ Hoping help would come from above/ But even angels there make the same mistakes/ In love… and is Ferry at his most quaveringly anguished…

 

Bitters End is the final song on the album. The song is based on a group vocal arrangement done in a satirical 1950s doo-wop style. In the middle eight, the band sings ‘bizarre’, which seems to sum up the initial impact of the first listen to the album.

 

Discussing the album’s music, Andy Mackay later said: ‘We certainly didn’t invent eclecticism but we did say and prove that rock ‘n’ roll could accommodate – well, anything really’.

 

The band’s penchant for glamour was showcased both in the lyrics and in the 1950s-style album cover, with photography, hair dressing and art work credits detailed on the sleeve. The photographer, Karl Stoecker, shot the cover featuring model Kari-Ann Muller, who later married Chris Jagger, brother of Mick Jagger. The album’s original cover, as issued in 1972, featured a gatefold sleeve picturing the band in stage attire designed by Antony Price.

The entire album was recorded in a single week. This was necessary because the group had no record deal and their managers at EG were financing the sessions themselves. The album was produced by King Crimson’s lyricist, Peter Sinfield. In May 1972, a few weeks after the recording sessions, a contract was signed with Island Records and in June, Roxy Music was released.

Roxy Music was generally well-received by contemporary critics and reached #10 in the UK charts. It is now considered by many to be Roxy Music’s best album.

 

 

www.rjdent.com