Christopher Smart’s Jubilate Agno – Edited and Introduced by R J Dent

January 12, 2015

 

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‘There is no poem in English poetry that serves as a precursor to Jubilate Agno.‘  (Jeremy Reed) 

 

After many years, Christopher Smart’s bold, eccentric, powerful and moving epic poem Jubilate Agno is finally available to readers in a brand new, accessible edition.

 

Jubilate Agno is a vast free-form poem written between 1759 and 1763, during Smart’s confinement for insanity in St. Luke’s Hospital, Bethnal Green, London. The poem was first published in 1939, under the title Rejoice in the Lamb: A Song from Bedlam, edited by W. F. Stead from Smart’s manuscript, which Stead had discovered in a private library.

 

Jubilate Agno is an important example of eighteenth-century free verse that has been unavailable to readers of poetry for many years. It is an obvious precursor to T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land and to Allan Ginsberg’s Howl.

 

This brand new edition of Christopher Smart’s Jubilate Agno is edited and introduced by R J Dent.

 

Jubilate Agno is available from Amazon.co.uk:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Jubilate-Agno-Edited-Introduced-Dent-ebook/dp/B00S3E2DPU/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

 

and from Amazon.com:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Jubilate-Agno-Edited-Introduced-Dent-ebook/dp/B00S3E2DPU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1421092501&sr=8-3&keywords=jubilate+agno

 

 

Details of R J Dents novels, short stories, poems, essays and translations can be found at www.rjdent.com

 

Follow R J Dent’s work on:

website: http://www.rjdent.com/

blog: https://rjdent.wordpress.com/

twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/RJDent

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rjdentwriter

youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/rjdent69

 JA - CS

The Blood Delirium: The Vampire in 19th Century European Literature

November 29, 2014

 

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‘R J Dent’s translations are fresh with an exciting raw sexual edge…’ (Candice Black)

 

The Blood Delirium is a definitive collection of 19th century European literature in which the vampire or vampirism – both embodied and atmospheric – is featured or evoked. Twenty-three seminal works by classic European authors, covering the whole of that delirious period from Gothic and Romantic, through Symbolism and Decadence to proto-Surrealism and beyond, in a single volume charged with sex, blood and horror.

 

The Blood Delirium contains a detailed introduction (by editor Candice Black) which not only examines these texts and their meaning, but which also charts the literary and cultural climate in which the new cult of the vampire was allowed to flourish.

 

The Blood Delirium includes texts by Bram Stoker, J. Sheridan Le Fanu, Oscar Wilde, J.M. Rymer, Charles Baudelaire, Le Comte de Lautréamont, Paul Féval, Maurice Rollinat, Guy de Maupassant, Count Stenbock, Jean Lorrain, Théophile Gautier, Charles Nodier, John Polidori, J.K. Huysmans, Charlotte Brontë, Ivan Turgenev, Jan Neruda, Augustus Hare, Cyprien Berard and Léon Bloy.

 

Several of the texts in The Blood Delirium are translated by R J Dent into English for the very first time, including those by Cyprien Bérard, Paul Féval, and Maurice Rollinat.

 

 

The Blood Delirium is the definitive collection for literate vampire-lovers.

 

The Blood Delirium is available from:

 

http://www.amazon.com/The-Blood-Delirium-European-Literature/dp/0983884285

 

or from:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blood-Delirium-The-Candice-Black/dp/0983884285

 

 

www.rjdent.com

 

Myth by R J Dent

October 7, 2013

R J Dent’s Myth is a fantasy/horror novel set on a Greek island.

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R J Dent provides some information on his novel, Myth:

R J Dent reads an excerpt from his novel, Myth:

The book trailer for R J Dent’s novel, Myth:

A promotional poster for R J Dent’s novel, Myth:

myth r j dent poster

Myth is available as an e-book:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Myth-ebook/dp/B00FV6XBUY/ref=la_B0034Q3RD4_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1381743927&sr=1-7

and as a paperback:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Myth-R-J-Dent/dp/1843862670/ref=la_B0034Q3RD4_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1381743927&sr=1-4

http://www.rjdent.com

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Alcaeus: Poems & Fragments

February 15, 2011

 Translated by R J Dent

Alcaeus: Poems & Fragments – translated by R J Dent (ISBN 978-1-906451-53-0)

R J Dent’s sensitive modern English translation of the complete Poems & Fragments of Alcaeus is now available to download onto your Kindle at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Alcaeus-Poems-Fragments-ebook/dp/B007HT1ISA/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1331151350&sr=1-1

and:

http://www.amazon.com/Alcaeus-Poems-Fragments-ebook/dp/B007HT1ISA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1331151639&sr=8-2

and in ePub format (Sony, Kobo, etc) at:

http://www.hive.co.uk/ebook/alcaeus-poems-fragments/14018263/

and:

http://www.tescoebooks.com/tescoweb/search/SearchSingletitle.aspx?E=9781906451547

Alcaeus: Poems & Fragments is also available in paperback from Circaidy Gregory Press at:

http://www.circaidygregory.co.uk/alcaeus.htm

and from Amazon.co.uk:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Alcaeus-Poems-Fragments/dp/1906451532/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1329660575&sr=1-1

Alcaeus was a fellow countryman and contemporary of Sappho, and his beautiful and delicate poetry is often overshadowed by Sappho’s reputation. R J Dent has now translated all of Alcaeus’s Poems & Fragments from ancient Greek into lively modern English in an attempt to rescue Alcaeus’s ethereal poetry from obscurity.

There is no other published translation of Alcaeus: Poems & Fragments in existence.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZManZM65dGA&feature=plcp

Product Details:

Title: Alcaeus: Poems & Fragments – translated by R J Dent [Paperback Edition]

Paperback ISBN: 978-1-906451-53-0

Title: Alcaeus: Poems & Fragments – translated by R J Dent [Kindle Edition]

e-book ISBN: 978-1-906451-54-7

Translator: R J Dent

© R J Dent (2012)

Language: English 

Pages: 112

Paperback ISBN 978-1-906451-53-0 £7.49.  Orders available to trade and retail customers from http://www.circaidygregory.co.uk or to trade via Nielsen Teleorders. Contact sales@circaidygregory.co.uk for discount and SoR terms.

Alcaeus: Poems & Fragments (in paperback and kindle formats) is now available from Amazon, and in all other eformats from all i-stores. Orders available to trade from Gardners and Baker and Taylor.

Here’s a recent review of Alcaeus: Poems & Fragments:

http://hastingsonlinetimes.co.uk/arts-culture/creative-writing/a

R J Dent’s published works include a novel, Myth; translations of Charles Baudelaire’s The Flowers of Evil & Artificial Paradise; of Le Comte de Lautréamont’s The Songs of Maldoror; of Alcaeus’s Poems & Fragments; a Gothic novella, Deliverance; a poetry collection, Moonstone Silhouettes, and various stories, articles, essays, poems, etc, in a wide range of magazines, periodicals and journals, including Orbis, Philosophy Now, Acumen and Writer’s Muse. 

R J Dent’s Amazon page can be found at:

 http://www.amazon.co.uk/R.-J.-Dent

Details of R J Dent’s other works – novels, novellas, translations, stories, poems, essays and songs – are available on www.rjdent.com

Follow R J Dent’s work on:

website: http://www.rjdent.com/

blog: https://rjdent.wordpress.com/

twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/RJDent

facebook:http://www.facebook.com/pages/R-J-Dent/344369095423?v=wall

youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/rjdent69?feature=mhum#p/a/u/0/CmnYHWJqQK4

 

 

The Art of Connection: the Social Life of Sentences by Dr Ian McCormick

April 2, 2015

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Dr Ian McCormick’s latest book, The Art of Connection: the Social Life of Sentences is, as the subtitle suggests, a new guide to the art of transition in the English language which offers advice on how to deploy a wide range of connective words in order to improve the flow of ideas.

This book will assist anyone wishing to communicate more effectively in writing. Whether for the reader at school, at university or at work, The Art of Connection is an indispensable source book of essential words, phrases and ideas.

The Art of Connection begins by exploring the social life of sentences. It outlines the ways that connection and disconnection create thought-pathways in the process of composition. The educational psychology behind connection is also outlined. The Art of Connection then examines the relationship between natural flow and communicative improvisation. This dimension is contrasted with the conventions of rhetoric often used effectively in the past by great writers and speechmakers.

Different styles of writing and target audience or reader are also discussed. The Art of Connection also explores links between connection, logic and philosophy. Moving beyond traditional approaches to connection and transition, postmodern and feminist approaches to the question of communication, technique and style are also analysed.

Each chapter deals with the Nine Arts of Connection: Location, Timing, Comparison, Contrast and Difference, the Supplement, Disputation, Sequence, Example and Illustration, and the Summary. Hundreds of practical examples of usage, drawn from the humanities and the sciences, from religion and the social sciences, from law, business and medicine are used illustrate each of the key topics. This book will be essential reading for students of EFL/ESOL/IELTS, for school or university students, and for creative or non-fiction writers working with the English language.

The Art of Connection: the Social Life of Sentences is an invaluable guide to more effective communication in written or spoken English.

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Contents

1.0 Introduction

1.1 The Social Sentence

1.2 The Use of Connection

1.3 Understanding the Psychology of Transition

1.4 Style, Oratory, Elegance

1.5 The Flow of Spontaneity and Passion

1.6 Power, Rhetoric and Repetition

1.7 The Philosophy of Association

1.8 Beyond the Logic of Connection

1.9 Écriture féminine

1.10 Openings: the Genesis of this Book

2. The Art of Location

3. The Art of Timing

4. The Art of Comparison

5. The Art of Contrast and Difference

6. The Art of the Supplement

7. The Art of Disputation

8. The Art of the Sequence

9. The Art of Example and Illustration

10. The Art of the Summary
 

Format: Paperback and e-book

File Size: 1039 KB

Print Length: 178 pages

Publisher: Quibble Academic (19 Nov 2013)

Language: English

ASIN: B00GS5TYQ2

About the author: 

Dr Ian McCormick served as a Professor at the University of Northampton until 2009. He holds degrees in English Language and Literature (University of St Andrews (M.A.) and a doctorate awarded by the University of Leeds (PhD). His PhD was in the field of English literature and cultural history in the eighteenth century.

Dr McCormick’s work has been featured on the BBC (Radio and TV); in the Times Literary Supplement, The Observer, The Guardian, TimeOut (London), and academic journals.

Dr McCormick has also published and edited books on Gothic literature and Romanticism; modern and contemporary literature; teaching and learning strategies; drama education; and literary, critical and cultural theory; John Dryden and T.S. Eliot; sexuality and gender studies; modern literature; the contemporary Scottish novel; literary/critical/cultural theory. He is currently working on a book about Shakespearean tragedy.

Dr Ian McCormick’s books on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ian-McCormick/e/B00DI7GNI0/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1427936101&sr=1-2-ent

The Art of Connection: the Social Life of Sentences

by Dr Ian McCormick

Losted by R J Dent

March 4, 2015

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We holidayed in Dorset that year. When I say we, I mean me – Luke; my little sister – Beth; my father – Oliver; and my mother – Katherine. Our parents drove our estate car from our home in Brighton to our rented holiday home in Dorset on an overcast day. It took us nearly three hours to get there. By the time we arrived, Beth and I were very tetchy with each other. We pulled into the driveway of our rented cottage and I was the first out of the car, looking the place over, checking it out for potentially interesting things to do, to see, or places to explore.

          It was a two-storey, three-bedroom stone cottage. There were four such cottages, and the one that was ours for the week was number four – on the far right end, and overlooking meadows and fields. It looked good.

          I was about to go off exploring, when my father called me back and insisted I help unpack the car. I ran back and forth, emptying things out of the car, carrying items into the cottage, putting them in the relevant rooms – making sure I did my bit to help. After being designated a bedroom, I stowed my stuff away in the wardrobe and the drawers, and looked out of the window into a flint-walled garden that looked interestingly overgrown – and which seemed to lead onto a meadow via a metal-banded wooden gate. Across the meadow I could see a stream overhung with willow trees. Beyond the meadow was a field, a small copse, and past that a path that lead towards the beach. About a mile in the distance I could see the sea. It was a slate-grey colour. Read more…

 

 

Losted

Copyright © R J Dent 2015

 

www.rjdent.com

Can I Please Have My Star Back? by R J Dent

January 20, 2015

An extract from an abandoned science fiction novel.

 
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by R J Dent

 

As I drove past the crashed spaceship, I started thinking about how we (as a race) very soon accept things as they have become – and even start to take certain strange things for granted.

Eleven years ago it had crashed there. Not one single person had actually seen it crash, but everyone for miles around had heard it. It had screamed out of the sky at three in the morning, on the one and only morning in the history of the world when absolutely everyone was asleep. There had been no solitary night prowlers, no 24-hour café or shop workers, no out-with-dog walkers, no tea-breaking shift workers, no shop-doorway sleeping tramps, no passing through long-distance lorry drivers, no anybody at all to witness its Icarus-like descent from the skies, or its mighty crash into and onto the decrepit Odeon cinema. The cinema had been showing the new print of The Day the Earth Stood Still that week, so obviously there were a few news people who had said it was all a publicity stunt that had gone badly wrong. Later, of course, that particular theory was seen to be the first example of the desperate answer-groping that seemed to grip everyone over the next year or so. Read more…

Can I Please Have My Star Back?

Copyright (c) R J Dent 2009

www.rjdent.com

 

On Translating Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du Mal into English – by R J Dent

January 10, 2015

flowers of evil - r j dent - baudelaire

One of the frustrations, the challenges, the problems – and probably the joys – of translating Baudelaire’s poetry is choosing the correct idiom to translate into.

Taking the words, sentences, phrases, lines, from the language of one country and translating them into the corresponding or equivalent language of another country is the type of work that can be done by almost anyone.

However, choosing the absolutely perfect cultural, social, geographical, spatial, historical, temporal and linguistic framework to put the translated words onto is another matter entirely, and will very much depend on the translator’s intentions and the receptive vocabulary of the proposed readership.

And when it’s poetry that is being translated, the task becomes even more complicated; the problems suddenly multiply. Read more…

 

On Translating Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du Mal into English

Copyright (c) R J Dent (2007)

www.rjdent.com

A Secret Home by R J Dent

January 9, 2015

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There was no road.

          I was in my white Ford GT6 with Concetta. Vaughn was in his mustard Lamborghini with Angela. We were brothers. They were sisters. They were our girlfriends. We were racing across the desert, along a canyon, heading for a huge natural wall of rock.

          If anyone had been watching us, it would have looked as though we were going crash into the base of the canyon wall. But no one was watching us. I’d chosen the site for our secret home very carefully.

          With only a few metres to go before impact, I pressed the remote control unit and the solid stone wall began to part. The huge door to our secret home was opening to let us back in. Summer had called us away for three months. Now we were back. Read more…

A Secret Home

Copyright (c) R J Dent (2010)

www.rjdent.com

 

Grearly’s by R J Dent

January 9, 2015

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Everyone in town knew that Vic Mottram hated Brian Grearly. Grearly’s death meant that Mottram would probably find a way to take over Grearly’s. He’d always wanted it, ever since it had opened five years ago.

Grearly was the owner and proprietor and staff member and designer of Grearly’s. Grearly’s was an experiment in catering and style which had succeeded far beyond Grearly’s wildest expectations.

Brian Grearly was the only child of Richard and Carla Grearly. They were both schoolteachers at the local Junior School. It was where they’d met, it was where they’d had their wedding reception; it was where they had worked all their lives; it was where they still worked – and it was, not surprisingly, where they wanted their son to work too. They probably thought of it as a family tradition or something. Anyway, Brian Grearly had other plans. When he was twenty-one, he left university with a degree in Business Studies and Accountancy and went into business for himself. Read more…

Grearly’s

Copyright (c) R J Dent (2010)

www.rjdent.com

 

Some of the Life of Gilbert by R J Dent

January 9, 2015

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Gilbert was very, very fed up.

          He’d been sitting inside a locked vault for several weeks and wanted to be out in the world again – circulating, as he’d been created to do. He thought back to his last week of independence; the way he’d been happily mixing with others, in and out of different environments, aware of movements and touch. He’d made a lot of people happy and had not been bored once.

          Now – a few weeks later – he was feeling a little dull, there being no light, movement or friction in the vault. He’d asked some of the others about possible futures, but they were all – with the exception of Rhonda – too busy crowing about past glories.

          “Once,” Oswald rather pompously stated – for the twentieth time – “I was exchanged – with a few others – for a Rolls Royce.”

          “You said Jaguar before,” Ellen said shrilly.

          “Or was it a Rover?” Jamie asked in his soft voice.

          “The type of car doesn’t matter,” Oswald snapped impatiently. “What is of paramount importance is that my personal value is far higher than yours.”

          “But you’re worth exactly the same as the rest of us,” Gilbert interrupted.

          Oswald sighed in exasperation. “I’m very much aware of my value, thank you, Gilbert. My point is that – unlike many of you – my actual value exceeds my stated value. Read more…

Some of the Life of Gilbert

Copyright (c) R J Dent (2010)

www.rjdent.com

Harry by R J Dent

January 9, 2015

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It was exactly one week after her birthday that Muriel realized that Harry was a robot.

          Up until then, she’d just thought that he was as near as it was possible to get – for a man – to being a perfect human being.

          He did everything for her: listened to her, helped her, did jobs around the house without being prompted and took her on surprise holidays. On top of all that he was good-looking, had a great sense of humour, was a great fuck and did his job well. Muriel couldn’t help but be in love with him.

          Yet at odd times, there was something a little distant about him. When he didn’t know she was watching him, she saw a look of detachment cross his features, as though he’d suddenly switched off from her and her world. This hurt her a little, so one day she asked Harry about it. He apologized for giving her that impression, but all it was was that she’d simply observed him when he was tired and trying to unwind from a hard day at work.

          “Are you sure?” she’d asked, and he’d taken her into his arms and held her tightly.

          “Of course,” he’d responded, stoking her head gently, before taking her to bed and making love to her. Read more…

Harry

Copyright (c) R J Dent (2010)

www.rjdent.com

The Host by R J Dent

January 9, 2015

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Eddie was watching the television.

          After a hard day’s work at the factory, there was nothing Eddie liked more than sitting down in his favourite armchair and watching whatever happened to be on the television. He’d flick from one channel to another as each programme ended, slowly eating his way through the huge portion of fish and chips he habitually bought on the way home from work.

          For Eddie, the television was a window onto the rest of the world.

          Thanks to the television, Eddie thought, I’m in touch with what’s going on on the planet.

          Eddie even had his favourite type of programme – documentaries. Not the ones in which the eating, drinking, mating and sleeping habits of some animal or other were shown, but the ones that showed real people in real situations – the ones Eddie called ‘True Life Dramas’.

          The best example of this, Eddie felt, was the ‘drama’ in which someone got wrongfully imprisoned, whereupon a research team would be galvanized into finding evidence which would prove the someone’s innocence. Read more…

The Host

Copyright (c) R J Dent (2010)

www.rjdent.com

 

 

 


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