Posts Tagged ‘Myth’

Myth by R J Dent

October 7, 2013

R J Dent’s Myth is a fantasy/horror novel set on a Greek island.

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R J Dent provides some information on his novel, Myth:

R J Dent reads an excerpt from his novel, Myth:

The book trailer for R J Dent’s novel, Myth:

A promotional poster for R J Dent’s novel, Myth:

myth r j dent poster

Myth is available as an e-book:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Myth-ebook/dp/B00FV6XBUY/ref=la_B0034Q3RD4_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1381743927&sr=1-7

and as a paperback:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Myth-R-J-Dent/dp/1843862670/ref=la_B0034Q3RD4_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1381743927&sr=1-4

http://www.rjdent.com

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Myth by R J Dent

November 15, 2010


‘A cross between An American Werewolf in London and Clive Barker’s Nightbreed’ (Amazon)

This is R J Dent’s novel Myth,  a dark, erotic fantasy set on a Greek island.


It tells the story of a couple (James and Penny) who hear about the chimera, a strange mythical creature that lives in the hills. They, of course, are sceptical, but also curious. Eventually, curiosity wins out and they set off with a guide, up into the hills to see the chimera for themselves.


Obviously things aren’t as they seem and the couple end up trapped in the hills. The man, James Barrett, defends himself against an attacker, but becomes susceptible to the suggestion that he is now the mythical beast, having defeated the one that attacked him.


He rejects this idea and instead focuses on caring for Penny, who has been injured. James then tries to get back to the village, only to realise that the whole village have duped him. He then opts for revenge against the village and goes on the rampage, destroying everyone he comes into contact with. He becomes monstrous.


R J Dent says: ‘I wrote Myth because I was interested in the way people change when they’re in exotic locations – if they’re not xenophobic they either go native, become very nationalistic, or else become a wistful hybrid of the two. That was my starting point. I then simply added a Greek myth scenario, using the chimera as the indigenous antagonist.’


‘The Greek myth element decided the location, and the rest was simply charting what happened to the couple. I used Pavese’s idea that ‘travelling is a brutality’ – and that was it; I had my novel. All that was needed was an ending – which was made clear to me after I read Robert Graves’ comment that every Greek myth had a regional variation. With that in mind, I gave Myth seven very different regional variations.’


‘Writing Myth was a very good experience. I used a great deal of my familiarity with, and love of, various Greek islands, to inform my novel. I used locations, characters, names, etc, that I know well. For the last five years I’ve steeped myself in Greek culture. Some of that is reflected in Myth.’


Myth is ‘a cross between An American Werewolf in London and Clive Barker’s Nightbreed.’ (Amazon review)


myth-poster


You can buy Myth from Amazon.com at:

http://www.amazon.com/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1289859314&sr=8-1

or from Amazon.co.uk at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1

Details of my other works (books, stories, poems, essays) are available on:

www.rjdent.com



Angela Carter’s Lycanthropy

October 19, 2008
Angela Carter

  Angela Carter

 

If only Angela Carter had written a werewolf novel. She intended to – until cancer took her from us on February 16th 1992. Salmon Rushdie, a personal friend of Angela Carter’s wrote: ‘To watch The Company of Wolves, the film Angela Carter made with Neil Jordan, weaving together several of her wolf-narratives, is to long for the full-scale wolf-novel she never wrote.’

Angela Carter worked with director Neil Jordan on the script for the film. The Company of Wolves. Whilst based upon the short story of the same name from The Bloody Chamber, the plot of the film bears a resemblance to Angela Carter’s 1980 adaptation of The Company of Wolves radio play, which introduced such elements as the additional stories being told within the narrative by the characters themselves, such as Granny.

In an L.A. Weekly interview, Neil Jordan said: “In a normal film you have a story with different movements that program, develop, go a little bit off the trunk, come back, and end. In this film, the different movements of the plot are actually separate stories. You start with an introduction and then move into different stories that relate to the main theme, all building to the fairy tale that everybody knows. The opening element of the dreamer gave us the freedom to move from story to story.”

The original screenplay (as presented in The Curious Room) also featured an additional story being told by the huntsman, a very different final tale by Rosaleen (reminiscent of Carter’s Peter and the Wolf from her collection Black Venus) and a scene set in a church with an animal congregation.

Company-of-wolves-poster

Circuses, fairgrounds, freaks, mannequins, wolves, shape-shifters, Erl-kings, murderers, ghost trains, toyshops, castles, fairy tales, myths, legends, enchanted woods and mysterious forests – these are Angela Carter’s literary currency. In many ways she’s an English female version of Ray Bradbury; her writing is infused with a sense of wonder; a bitter-sweet nostalgia for what never was, and an ability to recast the modern as the mythological.

Carter’s book, The Bloody Chamber is packed with twisted, post-modern fairy tales, and contains enough howling wolves, spooky forests, haunted castles, mountain paths, psychopaths, woodcutters and shape-shifters to fill a book of Transylvanian folk tales. And every story has a powerful message that is delivered in an entertaining way. Serious stuff then, but also funny, tragic, comic, insightful, profound, hilarious, unsettling and powerful.

 

 

 

 

Angela Carter’s other books, particularly Nights at the Circus, Wise Children, Black Venus, Fireworks, and The Magic Toyshop are exceptional works. Her radio plays, collected as Come Unto These Yellow Sands are worth reading too.

Here’s a list of Angela Carter’s books:

 

Shadow Dance (1965) – a novel

The Magic Toyshop (1967) – a novel

Several Perceptions (1968) – a novel

Heroes and Villains (1969) – a novel

Love (1971) – a novel

The Infernal Desire Machines of Dr. Hoffman (1972) – a novel

Fireworks: Nine Profane Pieces (1974) – short stories

The Passion of New Eve (1977) – a novel

Comic and Curious Cats (1979) – children’s story

The Sadeian Woman: An Exercise in Cultural History (1979)

The Bloody Chamber (1979) – short stories

Nothing Sacred: Selected Writings (1982) – essays

Come Unto These Yellow Sands: Four Radio Plays (1985)

Black Venus (1985) – short stories

Nights at the Circus (1985) – a novel

Wise Children (1991) – a novel

Expletives Deleted (1992) – essays

The Virago Book of Fairy tales (Editor) (1992)

The Second Virago Book of Fairy Tales (Editor) (1992)

Wayward Girls and Wicked Women (Editor) 1993)

American Ghosts and Old World Wonders (1993) – short stories

Burning Your Boats: Collected Short Stories (1995)

Shaking a Leg: Collected Journalism and Writings (1996)

The Curious Room: Collected Dramatic Works (1997)

Sea-Cat and King Dragon (2000) – children’s story

The Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault (Translator) (2008)

Unicorn: The Poetry of Angela Carter (2015)

 

Here is a short film (by R J Dent) about the works of Angela Carter:

 

Angela Carter’s writing, like Anna Kavan’s, does not fit into an easy category. Hers is a unique voice, one that should be heard/read by more people. Start with The Company of Wolves and go on from there. Angela Carter’s books are worth reading: she’ll take you on a long, strange, and wonderful trip.

 

Angela Carter’s books are available at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Angela-Carter/e/B000APF7OY/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1462216395&sr=1-2-ent

 

ac

 

Angela Carter’s Lycanthropy

Copyright © R J Dent (2013)

 

 

www.rjdent.com

 


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Myth by R J Dent

June 16, 2008


‘A cross between An American Werewolf in London and Clive Barker’s Nightbreed (Amazon)

R J Dent’s novel, Myth, is a dark, erotic fantasy set on a Greek island.

It tells the story of a couple who hear about the chimera, a strange mythical creature that lives in the hills. They, of course, are sceptical, but also curious. Eventually, curiosity wins out and they set off with a guide, up into the hills to see the chimera for themselves.


Things are not as they seem and the couple end up trapped in the hills. The man, James Barrett, defends himself against an attacker, but becomes susceptible to the suggestion that he is now the mythical beast, having defeated the one that attacked him.


He rejects this idea and instead focuses on caring for Penny, his injured partner. He then tries to get back to the village, only to realise that the whole village have duped him. He then opts for revenge against the village and goes on the rampage, destroying everyone he comes into contact with. He becomes monstrous.


R J Dent says: ‘I won’t give away the ending – but I will say a little about the idea for the story. I wrote Myth because I was interested in the way people change when they’re on holiday – they either go native, become very nationalistic, or else become a wistful hybrid of the two. That was my starting point. I then simply added a Greek myth scenario, using the chimera as the indigenous antagonist.


‘The Greek myth element decided the location, and the rest was simply charting what happened to the couple. I used Pavese’s idea that ‘travelling is a brutality’ – and that was it; I had my novel. All that was needed was an ending – which was made clear to me after I read Robert Graves’ comment that every Greek myth had a regional variation. With that in mind, I gave Myth seven very different regional variations.


‘Writing Myth was a very good experience. I used a great deal of my familiarity with, and love of, various Greek islands, to inform my novel. I used locations, characters, names, etc, that I know well. For the last five years I’ve steeped myself in Greek culture. Some of that is reflected in Myth.’


Myth has received excellent reviews; one reviewer has written that Myth is ‘a cross between An American Werewolf in London and Clive Barker’s Nightbreed.’

Myth is available at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_2

 

myth-poster


You can also buy Myth from Amazon.com at:


http://www.amazon.com/Myth-R-J-Dent/dp/1843862670/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books


or from Amazon.co.uk at:


http://www.amazon.co.uk/Myth-R-J-Dent/dp/1843862670/sr=1-1/qid=1158511918/ref=sr_1_1/026-0473581-6694803?ie=UTF8&s=books


Details of R J Dent’s other works (books, stories, poems, essays) are available on:

www.rjdent.com


 

What Ayn Rand Did For Me

June 15, 2008

Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand was born Alisa Zinov’yevna Rosenbaum on February 2, 1905. She died on March 6, 1982. She was a Russian-born American novelist, philosopher, playwright, and screenwriter. She is best known for her novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, and for developing a philosophical system she called Objectivism. She advocated rational individualism and laissez-faire capitalism, and categorically rejected socialism, altruism, and religion. She left Russia and arrived in America where she adopted the name Ayn Rand and became a successful writer.

My first contact with Ayn Rand’s writing was when I found, in a tiny bookshop, a second-hand copy of her novella, Anthem.

I read Anthem and found it wonderful, insightful, inspiring. At the back of the book, there were advertisements for two other books of hers: The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. Within the year, I’d bought and read The Fountainhead.

 

The Fountainhead did what books are supposed to do; it changed me. It changed my life, my outlook, my views, my method of thinking. And then I read Atlas Shrugged. It is a powerful and moving story of what happens when the people who really run things go on strike.

It was followed by We The Living. The cover of We The Living (by Nick Gaetano) was one of the most haunting pictures I had seen for a long time.

I won’t give you a plot synopsis, but if you want to read a great novel with an individual versus the state theme, then The Fountainhead is the book for you. After that you could try Anthem, Atlas Shrugged and We The Living. They’re all excellent.

Here’s a short film of Ayn Rand’s fiction and non-fiction I have in my library:

As a writer, I learned a lot from Ayn Rand. I can now see that she’s not a particularly elegant stylist – her prose is quite clunky in places – but she is able to convey some rather large ideas in fairly fast-paced and well-plotted narratives. What Ayn Rand did for me was show me that as a writer I could incorporate philosophical ideas into my stories; that I could anchor them to the plot, to the characters, to the subtext, and the story would gain another layer of meaning.

When my novel Myth was published, I dedicated it to Alisa Zinov’yevna Rosenbaum, the young Russian woman who dreamed of making her way to America and becoming a successful writer.

In short, Ayn Rand’s influence on me is such that I dedicated my novel, Myth, to the memory of the woman who became Ayn Rand.

Ayn Rand’s books are available at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ayn-Rand/e/B000APYGIW/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1448117822&sr=1-2-ent

R J Dent’s books are available at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4

What Ayn Rand Did For Me

© R J Dent (2009 & 2015)

www.rjdent.com

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In Praise of Ray Bradbury

June 14, 2008

Ray Bradbury

As a writer, Ray Bradbury showed me how it was done. As a young boy, I loved his short stories – The Pedestrian, Dark They Were, and Golden-Eyed, The Fog Horn, The Lake, and The Sound of Thunder in particular. As a teenager I loved his collections that masqueraded as novels, such as The Illustrated Man and The Martian Chronicles. As a man I love his novels: Fahrenheit 451, Dandelion Wine, Something Wicked This Way Comes, Death is a Lonely Business, A Graveyard For Lunatics, and most recently, Farewell Summer.

However, I admire Ray Bradbury for more than just his writing talent. I admire him for having the courage to live as a writer, to spend his time writing, writing, writing – and not really bothering about anything else. I also admire him because he abandoned formal education and educated himself in the library – and then became a very successful writer.



As a writer he was prolific – novels, short stories, essays, poems, plays, film scripts and teleplays. He has written many of each. As a person, he was a living legend.

Ray Bradbury was born in 1920, He died today (5/6/12) aged 91. Until today, he was still writing and still enjoying his life. He said in a recent interview that it was his love of writing that kept him young.

Here is a bibliography:


Novels:


(1950) The Martian Chronicles

(1953) Fahrenheit 451

(1957) Dandelion Wine

(1962) Something Wicked This Way Comes

(1972) The Halloween Tree

(1985) Death Is a Lonely Business

(1990) A Graveyard for Lunatics

(1992) Green Shadows, White Whale

(2001) From the Dust Returned

(2004) Let’s All Kill Constance

(2006) Farewell Summer


Short Story Collections:


(1947) Dark Carnival

(1951) The Illustrated Man

(1953) The Golden Apples of the Sun

(1955) The October Country

(1959) A Medicine for Melancholy

(1959) The Day It Rained Forever

(1962) The Small Assassin

(1964) The Machineries of Joy

(1969) I Sing The Body Electric

(1976) Long After Midnight

(1980) One Timeless Spring

(1983) Dinosaur Tales

(1984) A Memory of Murder

(1988) The Toynbee Convector

(1996) Quicker Than The Eye

(1997) Driving Blind

(2002) One More for the Road

(2004) The Cat’s Pyjamas

(2007) Now and Forever: Somewhere a Band is Playing & Leviathan ’99

(2007) Summer Morning, Summer Night

(2009) We’ll Always Have Paris

Through each new book, I grew up with Ray Bradbury. He has a place in my heart and in my mind that no other writer has. He is the most important person to me in terms of literary influence; possibly more important than J.G. Ballard, Angela Carter, William S. Burroughs, Anna Kavan, or even Ayn Rand, who was so important to me that I dedicated my first novel, Myth, to her. Here is a short film of the Ray Bradbury books that I have in my library:

There is a wonderful piece of film in which Ray Bradbury talks to university students about writing. It is witty and informative – and at times very profound. It is worth watching for Bradbury’s insights into writing. Here it is:



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