Archive for the ‘Other Writers’ Category

Burt Hirschfeld’s Fire Island Tetralogy: Fire Island, Cindy on Fire, Fire in the Embers and Return to Fire Island

March 14, 2016

 

 

Burt Hirschfeld

Burt Hirschfeld

 

Burt Hirschfeld (22 May 1923–3 December 2004) was the author of over fifty books, several of them best-sellers. Probably his best known (and best-selling) novels are his Fire Island Tetralogy: Fire Island, Cindy on Fire, Fire in the Embers and Return to Fire Island.

 

 

Fire Island:

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Fire Island was the first of four novels set on the eponymous island. Fire Island: New York’s most beautiful beach resort… a sun-soaked playground for the bored sensation seekers.

Fire Island: where the wealthy, the sun worshippers, the hippies and the lonely housewives all flock in the summer. All come to find the freedom promised by the island.

Fire Island: where six friends share a summer house. Six people at their most vulnerable with ambitions they can’t hope to fulfil and hungers they can’t satisfy.

 

 

Cindy on Fire:

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Cindy on Fire is a sequel to Burt Hirschfeld’s Fire Island. In it, the author focuses on the life of Cindy Ashe from Fire Island. Like the first book, Cindy on Fire is a 500-plus page chronicle of the sex lives of the gone-to-seed sixties flower children, living on Fire Island. Cindy, the promiscuous teen of Fire Island, has grown up and is still very promiscuous.

Welcome to Cindy’s world – the decadent playground of society studs and jet-set perverts, of dirty old men lusting for naked young bodies and freaked-out hippies into acid rock sex scenes.

Follow Cindy’s search for fulfilment – out of her middle-class upbringing into the sordid glamour of international film making and on to a non-stop merry-go-round of exotic lovers. It’s a trip too hot to forget. And once you’ve Cindy Ashe, you’ll never forget her.

 

 Fire in the Embers:

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Fire in the Embers is a young writer’s fight for fame in a decadent society of instant success and fast failure.

Fire in the Embers tells of Mike Birns’ struggle to change the ocean-side bedrooms of Fire Island for the opulent offices of Hollywood, where eager girls are only too willing to trade their bodies to break into movies.

Fire in the Embers is about a man with too many easy women, too many long nights at the gaming tables and too much ambition to ignore the temptations.

 

Return to Fire Island:

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Fire Island – The East Coast playground for the beautiful achievers. They fight hard for success. Back on Fire Island, they enjoy the rewards.

Fire Island – A pleasure island where the sun comes up on last night’s lust. Where desire is hotter than the summer sun, and the warm nights are drenched in the fevered search for excitement.

Fire Island – Where the hot crowd comes to live out their fantasies.

In Return to Fire Island, Burt Hischfeld takes a look at the residents of Fire Island, and gives us a chronicle of the people who live and vacation where New York’s money and beauty buy every pleasure under the sun. And there’s a lot of money – and a lot of pleasures to be had.

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Burt Hirschfeld is a very powerful writer, with a talent for good dialogue, exotic settings, and excellent character insights.

 

Many of his books are available here:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Burt-Hirschfeld/e/B001HP1UD8

 

and here:

http://www.amazon.com/Burt-Hirschfeld/e/B001HP1UD8

and there are reviews of a few of his books here:

http://glorioustrash.blogspot.co.uk/2010/06/fire-island-glorious-70s-trash.html

 

Burt Hirschfeld’s Fire Island Tetralogy: Fire Island, Cindy on Fire, Fire in the Embers and Return to Fire Island.

 

© R J Dent (2016)

 

http://www.rjdent.com

 

 

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Pauline Baynes and J.R.R. Tolkien

January 25, 2016

Pauline Diana Baynes (9 September 1922 – 1 August 2008) was an English illustrator whose work can be found in more than one hundred books, notably several by J. R. R. Tolkien.

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Pauline Baynes was born in Hove, East Sussex. She spent much of her childhood in Farnham, studying at the Farnham School of Art (now the University for the Creative Arts) and eventually attended the Slade School of Fine Art.

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She worked for the Ministry of Defence, where she was soon transferred to a map-making department, and where she acquired skills that she later employed when she drew maps of Middle-Earth for J. R. R. Tolkien.

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In her obituary for The Daily Telegraph, Charlotte Cory described how Baynes and Tolkien came to be associated:

‘In 1948 Tolkien was visiting his publishers, George Allen & Unwin, to discuss some disappointing artwork that they had commissioned for his novella Farmer Giles of Ham, when he spotted, lying on a desk, some witty reinterpretations of medieval marginalia from the Luttrell Psalter that greatly appealed to him. These, it turned out, had been sent to the publishers ‘on spec’ by the then-unknown Pauline Baynes. Tolkien demanded that the creator of these drawings be set to work illustrating Farmer Giles of Ham and was delighted with the subsequent results, declaring that ‘Pauline Baynes has reduced my text to a commentary on her drawings’. Further collaboration between Tolkien and his Farmer Giles illustrator followed, and a lifelong friendship developed…’

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Tolkien wanted Pauline Baynes to illustrate The Lord of the Rings, but the book grew into a huge project that made that particular plan impractical. Nevertheless, Baynes created immaculately drawn and exquisitely coloured versions of the author’s maps of the lands travelled by Bilbo and Frodo Baggins.

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Baynes’ also designed a slipcase for the three volumes of Tolkien’s epic:

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The slipcase illustrations were later adapted for the cover for the original one-volume 1973 paperback edition – an indispensable prop of the seventies generation – with its evocative landscape of Middle-Earth viewed through a doorway of yellow, over-arching trees.

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The same designs were used for the 1981 three volumes edition.

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Eventually, a drawing by Pauline Baynes was used to illustrate Tolkien’s final hobbit piece, the poem, Bilbo’s Last Song:

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which appeared as a poster in 1974:

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and then as a book in 1990:

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Pauline Baynes was for a long while the only Tolkien illustrator of note.

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Her work was approved by Tolkien himself, but faded from view as the Tolkien industry began to expand in the late seventies and other artists quickly crowded the field, many of whom lacked Pauline Baynes’ subtlety and sympathy for the material.

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Pauline Baynes and J.R.R. Tolkien

© R J Dent 2016

Follow R J Dent’s work on:

website: http://www.rjdent.com/

blog: https://rjdent.wordpress.com/

twitter: https://twitter.com/RJDent

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rjdentwriter

youtube:  https://www.youtube.com/user/rjdent69

Georges Bataille

November 20, 2015

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Georges Bataille (10 September 1897 – 9 July 1962) was a French intellectual and writer working in literature, philosophy, and the history of art. His writings included novels, essays and poetry. His subjects included eroticism, mysticism and transgression.

His fiction includes:

Story of the Eye:

Story of the Eye (L’histoire de l’oeil) is a 1928 short novel that details the increasingly bizarre sexual perversions of a pair of teenage lovers. It is narrated by an unnamed young man looking back on his exploits.

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L’Abbé C:

L’Abbé C (1950) is a work of dark eroticism, centred on the relationship between two twentieth century brothers in a small French village, one of whom is a Catholic parish priest, while the other is a libertine. The novel explores issues of split subjectivity, existential angst and bad faith.

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Blue of Noon:

Blue of Noon (Le Bleu du Ciel) is a blackly compelling account of depravity and violence. It is an erotic novella in which the narrator travels from city to city in a surreal nightmare, experiencing squalor, sadism and drunken encounters that culminate in incest and necrophilia. Bataille completed the work in 1935, but it was not published until 1957.

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My Mother, Madame Edwarda, The Dead Man:

My Mother is a frank and intense depiction of a young man’s sexual initiation and corruption by his mother, where the profane becomes sacred, and intense experience is shown as the only way to transcend the boundaries of society and morality. Madame Edwarda is the story of a prostitute who calls herself God, and The Dead Man, published in 1964 after Bataille’s death, is a startling short tale of cruelty and desire.

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His non-fiction includes:

Eroticism:

Eroticism is a collection of essays on taboo and sacrifice, transgression and language, death and sensuality. Bataille examines these themes with an original, often startling perspective. He challenges any single discourse on the erotic. The scope of his inquiry ranges from Emily Bronte to Sade, from St. Therese to Claude Levi-Strauss and Dr. Kinsey; and his subjects include prostitution, mythical ecstasy, cruelty, desire and sexuality.

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Literature and Evil:

Literature and Evil is an extraordinary 1957 collection of essays, which begins with Bataille’s assertion that ‘Literature is not innocent.’ Bataille argues that only by acknowledging literature’s complicity with the knowledge of evil can literature communicate fully and intensely. The literary profiles of eight authors and their work, including Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du Mal and the writings of Sade, Kafka and Sartre, explore subjects such as violence, eroticism, childhood, myth and transgression.

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Georges Bataille’s books are available at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=george+bataille

Details of R J Dent’s work is available at:

Website: http://www.rjdent.com/

Blog: https://rjdent.wordpress.com/

twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/RJDent

facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/R-J-Dent/344369095423?v=wall

Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/rjdent69?feature=mhum#p/a/u/0/CmnYHWJqQK4

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_nty_author_2gf4mb19VD5NN

Feed the Need by Amanda Hodgson

June 14, 2015

 A review by R J Dent

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Feed The Need

by Amanda Hodgson

 

Amanda Hodgson’s Feed The Need is a book of seven stories that focus on eating disorders, food cravings, hunger, comfort eating, and the psychological and the physical need to feed.

 

The stories in Feed The Need are one-word titles. With the exceptions of ‘Perfection’ and ‘Succour’, the titles are the names of each story’s protagonist. In this collection we meet ‘Cathy’, ‘Meryl’, ‘Lily’, ‘Shemla’, and ‘Gemma’. Ms Hodgson introduces us to their complicated lives and shows us their food-related strategies for coping with a harsh and complex world.

 

The best stories in this moving collection shake themselves free of traditional endings and give the protagonists the expansiveness of the interior life, the poetry of feeling, and the blurred edges of personality.

 

There are cautionary tales here; there are celebratory stories here; there are horror stories here. The stories in Feed The Need are not kind or friendly. They are not escapist fictions. They are, according to the author, ‘Seven sour stories about eating’. It’s an apt description, because these stories will sink their teeth into you and continue to hold on long after you’ve finished reading.

 

Be warned.

 

Feed The Need is available at:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00ZARMJMA?%2AVersion%2A=1&%2Aentries%2A=0

and at:

http://www.amazon.com/FEED-NEED-Amanda-Hodgson-ebook/dp/B00ZARMJMA/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1434321844&sr=8-6&keywords=FEED+THE+NEED

Feed The Need

by Amanda Hodgson

A review by R J Dent

Copyright © R J Dent (2015)

www.rjdent.com

Voodoo Excess (Rolling with the Stones) by Jeremy Reed

April 21, 2015

 

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Voodoo Excess

(Rolling with the Stones)

by Jeremy Reed

with an introduction by R J Dent

 

Voodoo Excess, Jeremy Reed’s latest collection, is a history of the Rolling Stones in verse, prose and prose-poetry.

In Voodoo Excess, Jeremy Reed chronicles the Stones’ progress from the early days at the Crawdaddy Club in 1962 to the fiftieth anniversary in 2012; he explicates Mick Jagger’s dance steps and his accent; he examines the Rolling Stones’ logo; and the different ways Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood angle their cigarettes; he describes the emotional impact of the Stones’ Hyde Park performance; he details the Redlands bust and the anti-establishment stance and attitude of the band; and he looks unflinchingly at the violence of Altamont and the inevitable death of the summer of love.

Voodoo Excess is far more than a Rolling Stones biography and it is far more than a collection of Rolling Stones-themed poems and prose-poems – what Jeremy Reed has achieved with Voodoo Excess is to provide an incredibly in-depth, up-close and intimate chronicle of the life and times of a group of musicians who have – for fifty years – collectively and individually continued to define the term ‘rock and roll rebels’.

 

Product details:

Title: Voodoo Excess

Author: Jeremy Reed

Format: Paperback

Pages: 224 pages

Publisher: Enitharmon Press

Published: 12 June 2015

ISBN-10: 1907587500

ISBN-13: 978-1907587504

 

Contents

INTRODUCTION: The Rolling Stones and Jeremy Reed (by R J Dent)

PART 1 – THE GREATEST ROCK AND ROLL BAND IN THE WORLD

PART 2 – THE BRIAN JONES YEARS: 1962–1969

PART 3 – THE MICK TAYLOR YEARS: 1969–74

PART 4 – MEMORABILIA/BONUS MATERIAL

PART 5 – THE RONNIE WOOD YEARS: 1975–

 

Voodoo Excess is available at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Voodoo-Excess-Jeremy-Reed/dp/1907587500

and at:

http://www.amazon.com/Voodoo-Excess-Jeremy-Reed/dp/1907587500

and at:

https://www.waterstones.com/book/voodoo-excess/jeremy-reed/9781907587504

 

Follow Jeremy Reed’s work on http://www.jeremyreed.co.uk/

Follow R J Dent’s work on:

Website: http://www.rjdent.com/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4

Blog: https://rjdent.wordpress.com/

twitter: https://twitter.com/RJDent

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rjdentwriter

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/rjdent69

 LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/r-j-dent-29a8a724?trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile

 

The Art of Connection: the Social Life of Sentences by Dr Ian McCormick

April 2, 2015

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Dr Ian McCormick’s latest book, The Art of Connection: the Social Life of Sentences is, as the subtitle suggests, a new guide to the art of transition in the English language which offers advice on how to deploy a wide range of connective words in order to improve the flow of ideas.

This book will assist anyone wishing to communicate more effectively in writing. Whether for the reader at school, at university or at work, The Art of Connection is an indispensable source book of essential words, phrases and ideas.

The Art of Connection begins by exploring the social life of sentences. It outlines the ways that connection and disconnection create thought-pathways in the process of composition. The educational psychology behind connection is also outlined. The Art of Connection then examines the relationship between natural flow and communicative improvisation. This dimension is contrasted with the conventions of rhetoric often used effectively in the past by great writers and speechmakers.

Different styles of writing and target audience or reader are also discussed. The Art of Connection also explores links between connection, logic and philosophy. Moving beyond traditional approaches to connection and transition, postmodern and feminist approaches to the question of communication, technique and style are also analysed.

Each chapter deals with the Nine Arts of Connection: Location, Timing, Comparison, Contrast and Difference, the Supplement, Disputation, Sequence, Example and Illustration, and the Summary. Hundreds of practical examples of usage, drawn from the humanities and the sciences, from religion and the social sciences, from law, business and medicine are used illustrate each of the key topics. This book will be essential reading for students of EFL/ESOL/IELTS, for school or university students, and for creative or non-fiction writers working with the English language.

The Art of Connection: the Social Life of Sentences is an invaluable guide to more effective communication in written or spoken English.

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Contents

1.0 Introduction

1.1 The Social Sentence

1.2 The Use of Connection

1.3 Understanding the Psychology of Transition

1.4 Style, Oratory, Elegance

1.5 The Flow of Spontaneity and Passion

1.6 Power, Rhetoric and Repetition

1.7 The Philosophy of Association

1.8 Beyond the Logic of Connection

1.9 Écriture féminine

1.10 Openings: the Genesis of this Book

2. The Art of Location

3. The Art of Timing

4. The Art of Comparison

5. The Art of Contrast and Difference

6. The Art of the Supplement

7. The Art of Disputation

8. The Art of the Sequence

9. The Art of Example and Illustration

10. The Art of the Summary
 

Format: Paperback and e-book

File Size: 1039 KB

Print Length: 178 pages

Publisher: Quibble Academic (19 Nov 2013)

Language: English

ASIN: B00GS5TYQ2

About the author: 

Dr Ian McCormick served as a Professor at the University of Northampton until 2009. He holds degrees in English Language and Literature (University of St Andrews (M.A.) and a doctorate awarded by the University of Leeds (PhD). His PhD was in the field of English literature and cultural history in the eighteenth century.

Dr McCormick’s work has been featured on the BBC (Radio and TV); in the Times Literary Supplement, The Observer, The Guardian, TimeOut (London), and academic journals.

Dr McCormick has also published and edited books on Gothic literature and Romanticism; modern and contemporary literature; teaching and learning strategies; drama education; and literary, critical and cultural theory; John Dryden and T.S. Eliot; sexuality and gender studies; modern literature; the contemporary Scottish novel; literary/critical/cultural theory. He is currently working on a book about Shakespearean tragedy.

Dr Ian McCormick’s books on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ian-McCormick/e/B00DI7GNI0/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1427936101&sr=1-2-ent

The Art of Connection: the Social Life of Sentences

by Dr Ian McCormick

On Translating Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du Mal into English – by R J Dent

January 10, 2015

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One of the frustrations, the challenges, the problems – and probably the joys – of translating Baudelaire’s poetry is choosing the correct idiom to translate into.

Taking the words, sentences, phrases, lines, from the language of one country and translating them into the corresponding or equivalent language of another country is the type of work that can be done by almost anyone.

However, choosing the absolutely perfect cultural, social, geographical, spatial, historical, temporal and linguistic framework to put the translated words onto is another matter entirely, and will very much depend on the translator’s intentions and the receptive vocabulary of the proposed readership.

And when it’s poetry that is being translated, the task becomes even more complicated; the problems suddenly multiply. Read more…

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R J Dent says: ‘I found translating Charles Baudelaire’s influential poetry collection Les Fleurs du Mal from French into modern English to be a rewarding, but challenging experience. This essay outlines some of the challenges and joys of the translation process.’

 R J Dent’s English translation of The Flowers of Evil is available at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Flowers-Evil-Artificial-Paradise-Nocturnal/dp/0979984777/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

flowers of evil - r j dent - baudelaire

 

On Translating Baudelaire

Copyright © R J Dent (2007 & 2016)

 

Follow R J Dent’s work on:

 

website: http://www.rjdent.com/

amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/R.-J.-Dent/e/B0034Q3RD4

blog: https://rjdent.wordpress.com/

twitter: https://twitter.com/RJDent

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rjdentwriter

youtube:  https://www.youtube.com/user/rjdent69

 

Tom de Freston’s The Charnel House – a review by R J Dent

December 16, 2014

 

The Charnel House

Tom de Freston

A review by R J Dent

 

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Although Tom de Freston refers to his book, The Charnel House, as ‘a poetic graphic novel’, it’s a hybrid book which defies easy categorization. It’s a poetry anthology; it’s a series of paintings turned into comic strip format, complete with text; it’s a moving and profound multi-authored novel. The Charnel House shares literary and artistic territory with Spiegelman’s Maus, or Moore/Gibbons’ Watchmen, or Briggs’ When the Wind Blows. It also shares some of Samuel Beckett’s tragicomic preoccupations.

The Charnel House origins lie in a series of paintings Tom de Freston has created over the past few years, featuring a horse-headed human hybrid character; a character which Freston freely admits he appropriated from Picasso’s Guernica – and which also has similarities to the horse head in Fuseli’s The Nightmare. In The Charnel House, Freston has provided horse-head with a plausible world and a coherent narrative. The Charnel House narrative follows horse-head through the various stages of its existence.

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The effectiveness of Freston’s imagery is due to the careful juxtaposition of the terrible and the harrowing with the everyday. Scenes of mutation, mutilation, torture, sadness, death, sex, love and lust take place in various domestic settings; the action is constantly framed by windows, or lit up by bare bulbs, or reflected in mirrors, thereby making the reader culpable by being vicariously voyeuristic.

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The startling, often shocking, imagery is set out on the pages in classic graphic novel style and the accompanying poetry is positioned to complement the art that inspired it. The Charnel House challenges the reader’s engagement with both subject and subject matter by the employment of ekphrasis, a technique usually defined as ‘a literary description of or commentary on a visual work of art’. The Charnel House explores themes of identity and memory, love and loss, by presenting twisted and confused versions of the universal and the domestic; of reality and the nature of perception; of cruelty and suffering, and the relationship between the past, the present and the future.

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Contributions by 37 poets, each inspired by the original paintings, are set on the adjacent pages to the illustrations, and the graphic novel format and ekphrasis create a narrative. Mythology is used, historical and notable artworks are frequently referenced, as are images of modern-day political atrocities. This is where the real power of Freston’s use of ekphrasis becomes evident. Although horse-head is constantly on the cusp of revelation, of understanding exactly who and where it is, he/it is never able to actually achieve enlightenment.

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But The Charnel House, despite its name, is not all sturm und drang, screams and shrieks, nihilism and existential angst; a major theme of the collection is identity, and the preoccupations of the self. It’s intense, dark, emotional, surreal, yet deeply personal and simultaneously universal. Admittedly, it’s a very tough collection to get through, but its content is immensely rich, and the poems and the illustrations are so moving that it’s worth the effort needed to read the whole work. It’s an incredible collection.

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The Charnel House is a very experimental and incredibly powerful anthology of poems and illustrations that explore the relationship between mind and body, reality and dreams, passion, lust, and love. It’s a deep, dark, emotional collection. Ultimately, The Charnel House is a work of great depth and imagination.

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The Charnel House is available as a free e-book and as a hardback published by Bridgedoor Press.

 

Tom de Freston’s work can be found at:

www.tomdefreston.co.uk

R J Dent’s work can be found at www.rjdent.com

The Blood Delirium: The Vampire in 19th Century European Literature

November 29, 2014

 

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‘R J Dent’s translations are fresh with an exciting raw sexual edge…’ (Candice Black)

 

The Blood Delirium is a definitive collection of 19th century European literature in which the vampire or vampirism – both embodied and atmospheric – is featured or evoked. Twenty-three seminal works by classic European authors, covering the whole of that delirious period from Gothic and Romantic, through Symbolism and Decadence to proto-Surrealism and beyond, in a single volume charged with sex, blood and horror.

 

The Blood Delirium contains a detailed introduction (by editor Candice Black) which not only examines these texts and their meaning, but which also charts the literary and cultural climate in which the new cult of the vampire was allowed to flourish.

 

The Blood Delirium includes texts by Bram Stoker, J. Sheridan Le Fanu, Oscar Wilde, J.M. Rymer, Charles Baudelaire, Le Comte de Lautréamont, Paul Féval, Maurice Rollinat, Guy de Maupassant, Count Stenbock, Jean Lorrain, Théophile Gautier, Charles Nodier, John Polidori, J.K. Huysmans, Charlotte Brontë, Ivan Turgenev, Jan Neruda, Augustus Hare, Cyprien Berard and Léon Bloy.

 

Several of the texts in The Blood Delirium are translated by R J Dent into English for the very first time, including those by Cyprien Bérard, Paul Féval, and Maurice Rollinat.

 

 

The Blood Delirium is the definitive collection for literate vampire-lovers.

 

The Blood Delirium is available from:

 

http://www.amazon.com/The-Blood-Delirium-European-Literature/dp/0983884285

 

or from:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blood-Delirium-The-Candice-Black/dp/0983884285

 

 

www.rjdent.com

 

The Green Town Trilogy (Dandelion Wine, Summer Morning, Summer Night, and Farewell Summer) by Ray Bradbury

October 12, 2014

 

Ray Bradbury’s Green Town Trilogy is comprised of three books: Dandelion Wine, Summer Morning, Summer Night, and Farewell Summer. 

Dandelion Wine

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Dandelion Wine is a 1957 novel by Ray Bradbury, taking place in the summer of 1928 in the fictional town of Green Town, Illinois, based upon Bradbury’s childhood home of Waukegan, Illinois. The novel developed from the short story ‘Dandelion Wine’ which appeared in the June 1953 issue of Gourmet magazine.

The title refers to a wine made with dandelion petals and other ingredients, commonly citrus fruit. In the story, dandelion wine, as made by the protagonist’s grandfather, serves as a metaphor for packing all of the joys of summer into a single bottle.

The main character of the story is Douglas Spaulding, a twelve-year-old boy loosely patterned after Bradbury. Most of the book is focused on the routines of small-town America, and the simple joys of yesterday.

In the winter of 1955–56, after a consultation with his Doubleday editor, Bradbury deferred publication of a novel based on Green Town, the pseudonym for his hometown. Instead, he extracted seventeen stories and, with three other Green Town tales, published the 1957 book as Dandelion Wine.

Summer Morning, Summer Night

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The most significant of the remaining unpublished stories, scenes and fragments were published as two novels. One was under the originally intended name for the novel, Summer Morning, Summer Night, in 2007.

In Summer Morning, Summer Night, Bradbury returns to this signature locale with a generous new collection of twenty-seven stories and vignettes, seventeen of which have never been published before. Together, they illuminate some of Green Town’s previously hidden corners, and reaffirm Bradbury’s position as the undisputed master of a unique fictional universe. The core of Summer Morning, Summer Night was Bradbury’s witnessing of the American small-town and life in the American heartland.

Farewell Summer

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In 2006, Bradbury published the original novel that remained after the extractions, and re-titled it Farewell Summer.

Farewell Summer is a novel by Ray Bradbury, published on October 17, 2006. It was his last novel released in his lifetime. It is a sequel to his 1957 novel Dandelion Wine, and is set during an Indian summer in October 1929. The story concerns a mock war between the young and the old in Green Town, Illinois, and the sexual awakening of Doug Spaulding as he turns fourteen.

The first chapter, also titled Farewell Summer, appeared in The Stories of Ray Bradbury in 1980. Publishers Weekly called the novel a ‘poignant, wise but slight ‘extension’ of the indefatigable Bradbury’s semi-autobiographical Dandelion Wine’ and concluded, ‘Bradbury’s mature but fresh return to his beloved early writing conveys a depth of feeling.’ Kirkus Reviews found it ‘a thin work, heavily reliant on dialogue, but one that serves as an intriguing coda to one of Bradbury’s classics.’ Booklist said, ‘A touching meditation on memories, aging, and the endless cycle of birth and death, and a fitting capstone, perhaps, to a brilliant career.’

In the afterword to Farewell Summer, Bradbury contends that the novel was actually intended to follow what became the Dandelion Wine story arc as a complete book tentatively titled Summer Morning, Summer Night. ‘When I delivered it to my publishers they said, ‘My God, this is much too long. Why don’t we publish the first 90,000 words as a novel and keep the second part for some future year when it is ready to be published.’

Dandelion Wine, Summer Morning, Summer Night and Farewell Summer form The Green Town Trilogy, three novels inspired by Ray Bradbury’s childhood in Waukegan, Illinois.

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Ray Bradbury’s books are available at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ray-Bradbury/e/B000AQ1HW4/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

 

http://www.rjdent.com/